Saturday, December 15, 2007

What Is An Herb-Part II

I have heard the statement that herbs are just weeds, I actually may have been guilty of speaking that myself. But the truth is somewhere in-between. Herbs are weeds...but, there are edible weeds and those that are truely just weeds.

Some common " useful" weeds are actually healing herbs.
Nettle-one of the first spring green herbs, which was often made into nourishing soup.

Dandelion-the scourge of the suburban lawn, which is in fact a source of cleansing, bitter-green leaves and a root that, if roasted and ground, taste a lot like coffee. ( my mother used this during the food rationing in WWII.)

Commy Daisy-the leaves are a wonderful soothing agent for bruises and cuts, and the flower calms digestive problems.

China, India, and Arab have herbal history's that go back thousands upon thousands of years.

Just amazing that in so many ways this old and time tested art of healing has been pushed aside and by so many considered to be useless.

Want to know more about ancient herbal use as it applies to our modern day needs?

Visit http://www.sagehillfarmsandvintagestore.com
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Happy Holidays
EatWell-BeWell.

Bea Kunz
Sage Hill Farms

3 comments:

Dina at Wordfeeder.com said...

Here's how I look at it. Before there was agriculture, we had "weeds." Ancient peoples survived and thrived on these. Their medicinal purposes were passed along through the ages... a true gift from God and the earth. More people should recognize the healing properties and life-sustaining power of herbs.

Not to mention, they make food taste delicious! :)

BeaK. said...

Can we get an Amen for sister Dina!

Today I'm cooking a large pot of "Pinto" beans, seasoned with Sage Hill Farms "Cajun" seasoning.
Served over "herbed" rice.

Yummy...so good and good for you!

Recipe for Herbed rice will be on the blog shortly.

Bea Kunz
http://www.sagehillfarmsandvintagestore.com

organicsyes said...

Love the history lesson on herbs!
Thanks, Bea.